Dear Engaged Bystander: Images and words speak volumes about how people think and feel about an issue. Think about when we use the word bystander --  we usually describe that person as an "Innocent Bystander". We never hear the phrase "He/she was a Guilty Bystander."  
 

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Many of you are probably working on some aspect of grant writing and/or fundraising right now. I know I am. So I was really interested in this short article published over at Network for Good on 6 words every nonprofit should avoid. I'm not going to say a lot about it, since it's a pretty self-explanatory piece, except this: all 6 words show up (often) in my most recent grant application.
 
Damn.
 

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All you have to do is registered with the NSVRC website to acquire a username and password.  
If you already have login credentials for the NSVRC website there is no need to create new ones, just log in.

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Dear Engaged Bystander, Have you seen the recent disturbing story about the rape of a young girl (15 years old) on a side street, in broad daylight? Some media outlets are picking up the story and saying that no one did anything. Someone who drove by the scene was quoted as saying that they thought they were “just having sex.” It is hard to imagine -- this girl was raped on the sidewalk, with people driving by, in daylight, and remember, this is in the middle of winter!

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Welcome to the NSVRC's newest blog.  We invite you to post your ideas and comments about how to intervene to prevent sexual violence.  Share your ideas with our Guest Blogger, Joan Tabachnick! Read more about Joan.

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Forensic nurse examiners are by and large late adopters when it comes to technology. While it's fantastic to see so many of you creating pages and posting regularly on Facebook, there's still some untapped potential for spreading information in a far simpler and quicker manner: Twitter.
 

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Dear Engaged Bystander,
How do I begin a blog about engaging bystanders?   Why would you want to read this? Who am I to begin writing this blog?
 

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I am a hothead. Anyone reading this who knows me is smiling and nodding right now, because they know my default setting is holler. So I was intrigued by this post over at The Happiness Project last week about under-reacting to problems. That's not to say the post's author advocates ignoring or minimizing problems; simply that as she points out, not every problem requires a full-bore freakout.

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An issue that often comes up when we discuss SANE program sustainability is getting away from the "any warm body" method of staffing. Really looking instead at competencies and clear communication between program managers and prospective SANEs about the expectations and requirements of the role, so that both parties go into the relationship with open eyes. (You'd be stunned at how many people have told me that they've downplayed the realities of the job for fear of scaring new staff members away--bad strategy, by the way.) 
 

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