Dear Engaged Bystander,  The most rewarding project I have ever done in my real world work (e.g., not online) is to create a series of public dialogues across Vermont about sexual violence. We brought together survivors, offenders (who had successfully completed treatment), and family members in a panel discussion about prevention. In a community setting, it was incredibly powerful and profound to break the silence surrounding sexual abuse through respectful public conversations. 
 

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Dear Engaged Bystander,  if you have not seen this, NSVRC has been able to offer a discount on films with the Media Education Foundation.  They prodce some very interesting films and in particular, you may want to look at their newest film, The Line.   See the full description below. 
warmly
joan
 
The Line Campaign Description:
A one night stand far from home goes terribly wrong. As the filmmaker unravels her experience, she decides to confront her attacker.

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Over at RWJF's Future of Nursing blog, Dean Marla Salmon, from the University of Washington School of Nursing poses the question, what do we need to teach the nurse of tomorrow? This is a pretty important question, and one we have discussed frequently here at the sustainability project.

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Dear Engaged Bystander, In a recent interview with CALCASA about bystander enagement, I talked about the small ways that we can shift our thinking and the way we do our work. I mentioned a conference safety sheet and how a small change can move us away from “victim blaming” towards a more engaged community responsibility. 
 
Below is the original Safety Sheet from this conference. See if you can guess what changes make sense. 
 
Safety Tips

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Here's a practical concept for all of you managers: managing up. It's the idea of positioning people so as to accentuate the positive. You can manage up your boss, your staff and even your organization. When you think about how managing up creates an environment where people feel valued and respected, the sustainability implications become pretty clear: easier to recruit, easier to retain.
 

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Dear Engaged Bystander, I have been teaching workshops for a long time – so when I did my very first workshop about bystander engagement, I had a rude awakening. I thought it went really well, I had that nice feeling that I had connected with my audience and we all learned from that connection. But then at the end, one of the participants asked me, “But how do we get people who are not affected by sexual abuse to take action?” 
 
I had failed. 
 

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Dear Engaged Bystander: Images and words speak volumes about how people think and feel about an issue. Think about when we use the word bystander --  we usually describe that person as an "Innocent Bystander". We never hear the phrase "He/she was a Guilty Bystander."  
 

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Many of you are probably working on some aspect of grant writing and/or fundraising right now. I know I am. So I was really interested in this short article published over at Network for Good on 6 words every nonprofit should avoid. I'm not going to say a lot about it, since it's a pretty self-explanatory piece, except this: all 6 words show up (often) in my most recent grant application.
 
Damn.
 

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